GBM news Top 15 Most Powerful People of Color in LGBT Community

Description unavailable

Image by Indiewench via Flickr

Nathan James of GBM News compiled a list of the “Top 15 Most Powerful People of Color in the LGBT Community” in response to MSN Wonderwall’s article on the “The Most Powerful Gay Celebrities.” Included in MSN Wonderwall’s list TMZ creator Harvey Levin, Blogger Perez Hilton, music legend Elton John, actress and TV Host Ellen DeGeneres, fashion consultant Tim Gunn, and Interior Designer Nate Berkus . The list did not however include one people of color or a transgendered person.

“The list’s lack of diversity is representative of the ongoing problem of limited gay and transgender visibility in minority communities,” stated Kimberley McLeod, GLAAD‘s Communities of African Descent Media Field Strategist.

A commenter from GLAAD’s website said “I believe there’s something called ‘racism’, whether conscious or unconscious. MSNs people are either extremely ignorant or plain lazy in their researching–which amounts to racism by any other name. And, one pathetic and detrimental reality is that too many of us white folks still only see who looks like us.”

One celebrity of color who made Nathan James’ list, Ricky Martin received the Vito Russo Award from GLAAD at their 22nd Annual Media Awards (presented by Rokk Vodka) on March 20 2011 in New York. GLAAD also presented Russell Simmons with the Excellence in Media Award. “The Excellence in Media Award is presented to individuals who, through their work, have increased the visibility and understanding of the LGBT community in the media,” according to GLAAD. Simmons “has repeatedly spoken out on issues of concern to the LGBT community, urging Americans to support full equality.” Essence.com received the Outstanding Digital Journalism – Multimedia award for “Bridal Bliss: Aisha and Danielle” by Bobbi Misick and blogger Rod McCullom of Rod 2.0 was a GLAAD nominee.

Nathan James and GBM News Top 15 Most Powerful People of Color in the LGBT Community includes:

  1. Film producer, television producer, and entertainment attorney Nathan Hale Williams
  2. Director Maurice Jamal
  3. Taiwanese Designer Jason Wu
  4. Author and commenter Keith Boykin
  5. Army officer and face of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell Lt. Dan Cho
  6. Comedian Margaret Cho
  7. Pro-basketball player Sheryl Swoopes
  8. Emory University HIV/AIDS researcher Dr. David Malebranche
  9. Director and screenwriter Patrik-Ian Polk
  10. Singer Ricky Martin
  11. Author E. Lynn Harris
  12. Radio Personality DJ Baker
  13. Fashion Icon Andre Leon Talley
  14. Pastor, TV producer, and author Rev. Kevin E. Taylor
  15. Actor and author Stanley Bennett Clay

Some of their profiles:

E. Lynn Harris is the author of Just As I Am and Basketball Diaries and mentor to many black authors, gay and straight. His first book, Invisible Life, helped launch the careers of author black gay authors such as Terrence Dean, Clarence Nero, and James Earl Hardy (best known for the B-Boy Blues series).

Nathan Hale Williams is best known for co-starring in the Sundance Channel reality series Girls Who Like Boys Who Like Boys and worked on the film, Dirt Laundry. He’s the iN-Hale Entertainment.

At 26, Jason Wu was asked by Andre Leon Talley to design Michelle Obama’s dress for her Inaugural Gown. Now his designs are available at Bergdorf Goodman.

DJ Baker is a radio personality and creator/producer/host of Da Doo-Dirty Show, a hip/hop and R&B radio show (All Digital Radio Network, Qnation.fm, and K-Zone 187.1) which features news, gossip, and showcases LGBT and indie artists.

Directors Maurice Jamal and Patrik-Ian Polk are best known for their projects Ski Trip and Noah’s Arc. Maurice Jamal is the creator of the GLO Network, the world’s first Urban LGBT network. GLO offers TV programming and movies online currently. Patrik-Ian Polk is currently developing a Noah’s Arc series spin-off for Logo TV and a drama series for BET.

David J. Malebranche, MD, MPH, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University’s School of Medicine, HIV researcher and advocate, and “is known as a dynamic speaker nationwide and has appeared in documentaries on CNN, ABC News Primetime, TV One and BET for his expertise on HIV in the Black community. Malebranche wrote “A Letter to Oprah” after watching her show about a woman who sued her husband for 12 million dollars because she contracted HIV from him. Read the entire letter below. Interesting enough The Oprah Winfrey Show received Outstanding Talk Show Episode from GLAAD for the episode “Ricky Martin Coming Out as a Gay Man and a New Dad.”

For more profiles go to GBM News.

Unfortunately Nathan James’ list did not include any transgendered or gender queer leaders and/or personalities of color. The list could have included RuPaul legendary drag performer, musician, and creator of the amazing Rupaul’s Drag Race on LOGO. Rupaul’s next album, Glamazon, is set to be released later this year (I know it’ll be “fierce fierce fierce).

Prominent transgender and gender queer celebrities include icon Amanda Lepore, Brazilian model and muse of Givenchy’s creative director Riccardo Tisci Lea T who posed nude in French Vogue, appeared in Givenchy’s Fall 2010 ad campaign, and famously interviewed by Oprah, actress and performer Candis Cayne, transman pornstar Buck Angel who bills himself as “The Man With a Va jay jay,” transman photographer and activist Loren Cameron, and New York performer, actress, and producer Laverne Cox who appeared on “I Want to Work For Diddy” (which won a GLAAD award for “Outstanding Reality Show) and co-produced Being T, a documentary looking into the lives of 12 transgendered New York women. Being T was executive produced by Janet Jackson. Cox has appeared on HBO’s series “Bored To Death” and the documentary “I Am The Standard.” Also Andre J international personality most-known for his cover of French Vogue and his gender bending style.

Maybe MSN’s WonderWall or Nathan James’ list for next year will include trans or gender queer leaders and/or personalities.

David J. Malebranche’s Letter to Oprah

Dear Oprah,

On a beautiful, sunny October 7th afternoon in Atlanta, Georgia, I sat down to enjoy a rare occasion where I could come home early from work to catch a new episode of your daily talk show that I have watched on and off for the better part of the past 3 decades. Upon pressing the info button on my remote, I learned that your show would be discussing a woman who “sued her husband for 12 million and won,” after finding out he had given her the HIV virus. To say I watched this episode unfold in horror is a profound understatement – I was uncomfortably riveted and disgusted for the entire hour.

To be quite clear, I wasn’t horrified or disgusted by the fact that this unfortunate Black woman had contracted HIV as a result of her husband’s secretive “Down Low” infidelities with other men. As a Black gay male, physician and public health advocate who has dedicated the past 12 years of my life to the behavioral prevention and treatment of HIV in the Black community, I have heard stories like your guest’s on this day more times than I would like to admit. To the contrary, the acidic taste of bile that coated the back of my throat as I heard her story was in response to the superficial and sensationalistic manner in which you handled the topic, and how it was apparent that you and your staff have learned absolutely nothing in the 6 years since you originally interviewed J.L. King on your “Down Low” episode in 2004.

Yes, you can claim that for this updated version of your “Down Low” show, you actually included the fact that publically “heterosexual” White men and men of other races are equally capable of having secretive homosexual affairs as their Black counterparts. And yes, this new version of J.L. King who again opportunistically sashayed onto your stage to promote himself now uses the word “gay” to describe his sexual identity (partly as a consequence of the fame and fortune he attained from appearing on your show). However, everything else about the show remained stuck in a metaphorical time warp in which Black women are portrayed as simple victims with no personal responsibility or accountability when it comes to their sexual behavior, and Black men are projected as nothing more than predatory liars, cheaters and “mosquito-like” vectors of disease when it comes to HIV.

I felt like I was like watching a train wreck or an car accident about to happen: it was so awful that despite wanting to turn it off, I found myself transfixed and could not bring myself to pick up the remote or change the channel. From the ominous background music and blurred images on the screen when discussing Black men being intimate with one another (God forbid!), to your declaration that reading your guest’s husband’s sexually explicit emails and messages on gay websites “blew your mind,” the way in which your show was staged did nothing to forward the conversation on the current facts or the social context that currently drives secretive same sex behavior among Black men and the current HIV racial disparity in the United States. Instead, what came across was a clear, fear-mongering and hyperbolic message: “Black women, look out for your husbands, they could be lying and cheating on you with other men and putting you at risk for HIV.”

It was bad enough that 6 years ago, after your original “Down Low” show, you single-handedly launched a major media and cultural hysteria where Black women across the country were now searching for signs of how they could tell if their men were “on the Down Low” through stereotypical signs and ridiculously offensive generalizations about how homosexual men think and act. Your show also helped J.L. King and other self-proclaimed “HIV experts” make a lot of money off this capitalistic, fear-based industry to promote their books, movies and narcissistic products on the so-called “Down Low.” It did nothing, however, but open new wounds and put salt in the old scars caused by centuries of sexual exploitation and calculated pathologizing of Black bodies in the United States and internationally. The way you and your staff have handled this topic has done nothing but widen the already irreparable rifts between Black men and women, as well as between Black heterosexual and non-heterosexual peoples.

While I realize that this is your show’s “final season,” let me give you and your staff some suggestions on how you can better address this issue of the “Down Low” and HIV in the Black community if you ever wish to revisit this issue during this year:

Please do some research on the facts explaining why so many Black women in the United States are contracting HIV. I can guarantee you that what you find will surprise you, as the vast majority of cases are not due to so-called “Down Low” Black men. Remember that in other countries like South Africa, India, Russia and China, there are millions of HIV cases attributable to heterosexual transmission. Ask yourselves where is the proof, outside of anecdotal stories that are splashed on your show, BET and the pages of Essence magazine, that bisexual men are primarily accountable for this horrible disparity among Black women?

If you are going to tell the story of HIV in the Black community, please give equal consideration to the social context and personal story/struggles of Black men who contract the virus, regardless of whether it is through IV drug use or sexual behavior. I can tell you for certain that if you sit down and ask these men to tell their stories, you will undoubtedly have your eyes opened to the fact that there is much more to their lives than the “predator” labels you so easily ascribe to their actions. And believe it or not, Black men can also be “victims” of this disease when exposed through their wives or female sexual partners who don’t tell them about the other people with whom THEY have been having sex.

If you are going to talk about the so-called “Down Low,” then really talk about it. That means, be prepared to discuss how Black men are socialized in this country to believe that our manhood solely exists in our athletic prowess, entertainment value, and the size and potency of the flap of skin that dangles between our legs. Moreover, be prepared to talk about how these manhood expectations placed on Black man are in stark contrast to the stereotypical images and expectations of “gay” men we see in the media: White men who assume a gender performance of how women are traditionally expected to act. And then talk about our society’s pervasive disdain, hatred and religious condemnation of anything that does not fall into a heterosexual “man-woman” norm of relationships and behavior, and how this puts pressure on men to deny who they truly are for fear of rejection and isolation.

Only when you begin to scratch the surface of these dynamics can you begin to rise above your current myopic and pathologic lens through which you view and project secret homosexuality and bisexuality as an “immoral act” on your show.

Have your team do better research on the notion that just because men do not disclose that they have same sex relations to their female sexual partners DOES NOT automatically mean that they are irresponsible when it comes to condom use. Simply put, “coming out of the closet” does not mean that a formerly “Down Low” brother will increase his condom use. I can provide you team with numerous studies to support this statement if it goes against your preconceived notions of the so-called “benefits” of “coming out.”

Withhold your judgment and disdain for explicit homosexual websites until you take time to explore websites like craigslist, nudeafrica.com, xtube.com and the many others that heterosexuals are just as freaky, raunchy and sex-crazed as homosexuals are. If you really want to read some conversations, pictures and videos that will “blow your mind,” check out these websites and do a show on how HUMAN BEINGS are sexual creatures – instead of suggesting that homosexually active people have a monopoly on that market.

Finally, if you are going to have a discourse on homosexuality or bisexuality on your show in the future, please be bold and courageous enough to tell the various sides of men’s stories. We are not all self-loathing, secretive, unprotected sex-having, disease ridden liars. Surely in the work you have done in the entertainment field over the past 3 decades, you have interacted with enough same gender loving men to realize that sexuality is a fluid journey for anyone, and that there are many Black homosexual men who are well-adjusted, comfortable with who we are, and at peace with our lives.

Oprah, I was so disappointed with your show and treatment of this follow up to your “Down Low” episode 6 years ago that I don’t know if I really care to watch the remainder of this, your final season. As a seasoned journalist, you have intricately described and explored the nuances of diverse topics such as eating disorders, mental health, spirituality, violence and criminality, cultural diversity and even the benevolent nature of human beings on numerous shows. You have approached these topics with a sensitivity and attention to detail regarding the social contexts driving human behavior, that even the most skeptical viewer can understand why some people do the things they do. So why is it with this topic (the so-called “Down Low”), particularly when it comes to the task of actually humanizing Black men, that you and your staff appear mentally, emotionally and intellectually incapable of creating a show that shows the rich, diverse and complex experience of being a Black male and homosexual in this country? Is it really that difficult?

As one of the most powerful human beings this country has seen in the past 30 years, and someone whose show I grew up watching, it would be nice if you realized your influence and took more personal responsibility for the quality of your shows that address serious topics like HIV in the Black community. The careless manner in which you continue to drive a wedge between relationships among Black men and women, between heterosexuals and homosexuals in this country through your one-sided analysis of Black sexuality in your shows is reprehensible. And I for, one, refuse to sit by idly and say nothing while you spoon feed sensationalism and fear to our community who will all too willingly eat every last drop because it comes from your hand. I need you to do better Oprah – the world is watching.

David J. Malebranche, MD, MPH

Advertisements

10 Comments

Filed under News

10 responses to “GBM news Top 15 Most Powerful People of Color in LGBT Community

  1. Pingback: black lgbt artsy event: san francisco: 4/21/11: tongues untied film screening @ GLBT History Museum | victor yates

  2. Pingback: Top 15 Most Powerful People of Color in LGBT Community « Release Dorothy!

  3. FionaCowell

    Always be careful about STD.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 19,000,000 new STD cases occur each year in the United States,and some of them have to choose to date at some std dating site.A astonishin news have showed the day before yesterday that there are more than almost million of people have joined a Website named “herpesmingle”,which provided std dating since 2001.

  4. THANK YOU SOO MUCH FOR RE POSTING.. I REALLY APPRECIATE YOUR SUPPORT AND THAN YOU SO MUCH FOR LISTENING TO THE SHOW.. ARE WE FRIENDS ON FACEBOOK? IF NOT.. LETS BE.. SEARCH FOR ME UNDER DJ BAKER.. AND AGAIN THANK YOU SOO MUCH.. KEEP IN TOUCH

  5. 137632 930115I ran into this page accidentally, surprisingly, this really is a fantastic site. The web site owner has done a fantastic job writing/collecting articles to post, the information here is actually insightful. You just secured yourself a guarenteed reader. 576738

  6. you are in point of fact a good webmaster. The site loading velocity is
    incredible. It kind of feels that you are doing any unique trick.
    Furthermore, The contents are masterwork. you’ve done a wonderful task in this topic!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s